Tag Archives: Family Life

Gareth Bryant vs. Annam Choudhry:

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Author’s-Note:
Every month I’ll be conducting a Poetic-Challenge, challenging various poets, whom I personally know/interact with, just for the sake of sharpening/improving my own poetry, general-goodwill, respect for my fellow “Brethren of the Paper & Pen”, and to just see who from among us has the best “Poetry-Skillz”…Every month, I’ll be picking a brand-new Poetic-Challenger, via Facebook/Twitter, to compete with. This month, it’s Annam Choudhry. Next month, it could very well be anyone of you. So, just be prepared, with some fresh-rhymes.

Topic: Mothers

Gareth Bryant

Gareth Bryant

Mother are like no Others:

She carried you inside her womb…
…Inside them, we grew to bloom.

In Arabic, Womb means Protection…
…From disease, as well as infection.

We were evolved, developed inside her, for 9-months…
…Though we occupied her space, she didn’t care much.

That’s how much she really loved you…
…The mark of commitment that’s true.

When we came into the Mundane, they dried our tears…
…She rocked us to sleep, calmed our freights and fears.

She taught you how to spell, read and write…
…She taught you how to dress and be polite.

While our Fathers taught us about toughness, they taught, showed, us to love…
…When our peers encourage us to seek vengeance, they teach us to forgive.

Fed you from her plate, starved herself, so that you would have the lion’s share…
…But, when they need us, to help them, we cast them aside & we don’t even care.

Our mothers kept us in their bodies, for almost a whole year…
…The protected us, but, now, we fill their hearts with much fear.

We have the audacity to raise our voices, when they tell us something that we don’t like…
…And, as mothers do, they always are willing to do for us, like nothing happened, so nice.

When Fathers die, or run away, it’s the Mothers who stay the course, and hold things down, without any such complaint…
…This is why Ummah, meaning Society, is from the word Umm, which means Mother; their contributions to our lives great.

Gareth Bryant/2014

Annam Choudhry

Annam Choudhry

A Mother’s Love:

A void that cannot be filled with anything other than Allah

Because when her soul has departed from her body,

There will be no one on the face of this Earth

Who could love you like she did.

Accept you like she did.

Hold, mold, break, shake,

Make you like she did–a mother’s love.

Her body made you, flesh and bones, only by His Will

And no matter how many times you would break the fragile flesh of her heart

The shattered pieces would come together, a perpetual miracle

Because of the Mercy and love placed in it from Allah

A mother’s love.

When you entered the house late at night

Wiped your feet all over your mother’s rights,

Know that it was her love for you that wouldn’t let her go to sleep

And her love for you that gave her grief

And her love for you that kept her pleading to Allah

To protect you from harm’s way, to guide you,

To make firm, in Him, your belief.

A mother’s love.

She enjoyed your childhood for a fleeting moment

Working to feed you, check by check, time stolen

Diapers, Gerber, Similac;

Tears and wailing, she often thinks back.

Though times were harder, it was much sweeter

Because her baby couldn’t disrespect her

But you could as a teenager

With your oppressive behavior

She didn’t know her baby would become her slave master–

Sign of the times. But even when time’s a changin,

What remains the same is

A mother’s love.

Don’t abuse her, ‘cause one day you’ll lose her

Place yourself in the future

Nothing will bring back your mother,

your mother,

your mother.

So love her.

Nothing will bring back her love.

Annam Choudhry/2014

Gareth Bryant’s advice on how to treat Women:

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Muhammad (Peace be upon him) said, “A woman is like a rib: If you attempt to straighten it, it will break.”.(al-Bukahri/Riyadh-us-Salihin)

Much more important than a rib, the Human female can/will break, if you treat a woman, any woman harshly: Don’t attempt to “straighten” or “fix” her-Women don’t need to be “straightened” or “fixed”; rather, they just need to be understood, respected, protected, cherished, and dealt with in a humane, dignified, honorable fashion.

Domestic-Violence has no place in the Muslim-Community!!!

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Some time ago, I was informed that a Muslim brother repeatedly beats on his wife. When I first received the news, the fact that this is still an actual practice is generally disgusting. But, the fact that Muslims do this is worse, and the fact that I know the person is excruciatingly painful to know. This is mainly due to the fact that Muhammad, the Messenger of Allah (Peace be upon him), the ultimate religious example to & for all Muslims, was never known to abuse any of his wives, not in the least. He was even known to have prohibited a Muslim woman from marrying a Muslim man who was known during his lifetime as a woman-beater. Yet, we who come after him, who claim to be adherents to his noble example & lifestyle, act completely the opposite of his example & lifestyle. Now, as Muslims we know that accusations against people without evidence is a sin in and of itself. But, the person who told me this is an upstanding member of the Muslim-Community, among those who know them. And, when this person related this news to me, I really didn’t know how to handle this shocking revelation, and to be honest, I still don’t really know how to deal with this.

I had been struggling to find a solution to my torn conviction, by thinking about the following questions: How do I approach a Muslim, who’s been accused of manifesting Domestic-Violence? How can I approach a Muslim about this issue, without either learning later on that the allegations themselves were fraudulent, or causing tension and/or hatred between this individual & myself? How am I supposed to react, if the person whom I approach admits to manifesting Domestic-Violence and/or won’t stop abusing their respective spouse? If it is confirmed that these allegations are true, will he be dealt with accordingly, or will he be given a pass because of his status in the Muslim-Community?

All of these most important questions have been spinning in my head, as if I was obligated to do or say something about this situation. There were actually additional questions that I had going through my mind like: Since the person who told me this obviously knew that this was going on before they told me, why would they only tell me? Also, the person who told me about this situation specifically requested that I keep this information confidential (i.e. I’m not supposed to tell anyone). Then, I started thinking to myself, and my thoughts turned into more questions: How can I, as a Muslim & a man, keep something like this a secret? Do I expose this situation anyway, in search of the truth, at the expense of blatantly violating the trust of someone who confided in me?  What if this backfires in my face, and it is not even investigated, or even taken seriously by the leaders of our community? What if the allegations are false & I begin to spread this allegation around, and because of me, this person’s reputation is tainted because of a lie?

Honestly, the whole affair is just a mess. One, for the simple fact that Domestic-Violence is a fabric of our society. Two, the fact that Muslims actually take part in such a shameful action. Three, the fact that a Muslim whom I know personally, a person whom I deemed to be a stand-up individual, (whom I now look at completely differently, in a negative way, because of this situation), has been accused of such a deplorable thing.

My gut-feeling tells me that I should do or say something. But, what should I do & what should I say? I don’t know the answers to any of these questions. But, I do know this: Domestic-Violence is a disgusting practice, that is used by cowardly individuals, to control others, under the guise of Islam. There are Muslims (some whom I probably know personally) who wouldn’t dare to strike another man in the street; yet, they’ll strike their own wives.

Also, many aspects of Domestic-Violence among Muslims stem from cultural constructs, which predate Islam arriving to certain civilizations & peoples and unfortunately, Domestic-Violence has not been culturally abandoned by many of these Muslims, who come from from homes & societies where there’s nothing wrong with beating your wife senseless. And, I’m not just picking on foreign/immigrant Muslims and/or people who were born Muslim; there are many Muslims who accepted Islam & Muslims hailing from Non-Muslim countries, who’ve grown up in families & societies where Domestic-Violence has been a normal part of life for generations.

Gareth Bryant/2012